Personal Trainer Disabled

Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex

Want to feel Mobile and more confident?

Do you struggle to get up from your favourite chair? Do you stay indoors all the time because it is too hard to go out? Are you always ill or worried about getting worse?

Daniel Welstead is a personal trainer for disabled people that guides them in their workouts, making them effective and healthy.

Daniel Welstead helps people who, because of their disability, cannot exercise normally find new possibilities.

 

For over 10 years I've helped adults in Kent, Sussex & Surrey with a plethora of health conditions acquire an active lifestyle, better mental and physical health, and recover from injuries via my award-winning personal training services. With my holistic, enthusiastic and personal approach, I am confident that I can help you.

Whether it be strength training, mobility, mindfulness, diet or improved cardio I can help you achieve your fitness, weight loss and health goals no matter your condition.

Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex

One constant is a personal trainer tailoring the workouts to take advantage of a person's unique level of ability and helping create a specific pathway toward personal fitness goals. Daniel Welstead personal training for the disabled, I use the same personal training approach to individuals with disabilities or restricted mobility that we use with every other client. When you personal train clients who are physically impaired, especially with physical disabilities, you will likely have to adjust exercises based on their mobility. You might even want to consider training your disabled client at home, like a mobile personal trainer.

 

There is a lot to understand when it comes to the specific needs of someone with a physical disability. A science-based education might enable some trainers to understand better the unique needs of the specific disability. However, experience is likely the most important attribute a trainer should have when working with a person who has a disability. I have worked extensively with clients who have developmental disabilities as well as those who are physically impaired.

 

I have spent over 10 years working with clients with both physical and cognitive disabilities. With a personal trainer's help, individuals with neurologically-based physical disabilities are able to fight off premature ageing, lower their risk for osteoporosis, and enhance their mood. Training for able-bodied clients, or even for elite athletes, can be taught via courses and books. However, nothing can replace the experience, creativity and patience for ultimate health and fitness results. Email me with details about your condition and goals.

Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex
Personal Trainer for Disabled & Brain Injury Kent Surrey Sussex

Benefits of Exercise for Disabled People with Disabilities

Studies have shown disabled individuals who use a wheelchair can reap the benefits of improved health if they engage in moderate to vigorous activity. People with disabilities who regularly exercise have a broad array of physical, mental, and emotional benefits.

 

The benefits of exercise for individuals with disabilities are even greater because of their more sedentary lifestyles. People with disabilities are less likely to participate in regular exercise, despite the many benefits associated with doing so.

 

Despite the many benefits associated with exercise, there are often barriers that keep individuals with disabilities from getting the recommended amount of physical activity. While there are a number of benefits people with disabilities can achieve with exercise, the sad reality is that there are still a number of barriers.

 

It is important for everyone, including people with disabilities, to get into the habit of exercising, both for everyone's physical and mental health. It is not just the important physical aspect of exercising for people with disabilities; it is also important to take care of your mental health. For people living with disabilities, there are ways and means of getting a fix on physical fitness, so let us look at why exercising is so important.

 

As soon as you get started, you will start feeling the benefits of a good workout -- and any kind of workout can be beneficial, physically, mentally, and even emotionally. Here's to a happier, healthier future - one in which we all feel capable of, and encouraged to, be active, to be friends, and to see the physical and mental benefits that exercise can bring.

 

Benefits can come from as little as 30-40 minutes of moderate activity, like getting around in your wheelchair, or as much intense exercise, such as playing 20 minutes of wheelchair basketball. Muscle-strengthening activities, such as modified yoga or working with resistance bands, offer added health benefits. Exercise can strengthen your heart, improve circulation, and reduce blood pressure.

 

The benefits of cardiovascular exercise promote better mental and physical health. Experts have linked substantial health benefits with providing a disability with access to physical and social activities on a daily basis. For certain classes of disabilities, such opportunities for improved physical and cardiovascular health may make a substantial difference in the quality of life.

 

Experts say that those benefits are true no matter one's abilities or level of ability, and staying active may be all the more crucial for those with disabilities. Older men and women who exercise regularly are less likely to experience any type of disability compared with those who do not. Studies show that exercise helps older adults keep up with mobility and avoid physical disabilities.

 

Ultimately, exercise that strengthens muscles helps disabled adults gain lean mass and bone density, which may help them avoid falls and increase balance. It is also important that doctors recommend physical activities to adults with disabilities, and direct them to resources and programs that may help integrate more physical activity into their lives. Increasing physical activity is often recommended for individuals with a physical disability, but competitive sports should be distinguished from physical fitness programs, remedial gymnastics, and recreational activities. Parents with Disabled Children Sometimes parents of children with disabilities have to get a bit creative in making physical activity a part of their children's diet, much like healthy eating.

Personal Trainer Disabled

A disabled person can often find it difficult to get the exercise they need to stay healthy. They may not have access to the right equipment or knowledgeable trainers, and they may feel self-conscious about working out in a public setting. Personal training can provide disabled clients with the customized support they need to reach their fitness goals. Trainers can work with disabled clients to assess their needs and develop a safe and effective workout plan. They can also provide encouragement and motivation, helping disabled clients to stay on track even when progress is slow. In addition, disabled clients may find that working with a personal trainer helps them to feel more confident and independent. For all these reasons, personal training can be an essential component of a disabled person's health care routine. A disabled person can often find it difficult to maintain an active lifestyle. Even basic tasks like getting out of bed or going for a walk can be a challenge. This is where personal training can make a big difference. A good personal trainer will tailor an exercise program to the disabled person's specific needs and abilities. They will also be able to provide motivation and encouragement, helping the disabled person to stay on track. In addition, the personal trainer will be able to supervise the disabled person during their workouts, making sure that they are using proper form and not overdoing it. As a result, personal training can be a great way for disabled people to stay active and healthy.